My Scholarly Reflections

This is where I tell what I think, so that I see what I say

Archive for July 2012

“The problem with our e…

leave a comment »

“The problem with our education system is we’ve taken this kind of narrow, reductionist, Aristotelianapproach to what learning is. It’s not designed for experimenting with complex systems and navigating your way through them in an intuitive way, which is what games teach. It’s not really designed for failure, which is also something games teach. I mean, I think that failure is a better teacher than success. Trial and error, reverse-engineering stuff in your mind—all the ways that kids interact with games—that’s the kind of thinking schools should be teaching. And I would argue that as the world becomes more complex, and as outcomes become less about success or failure, games are better at preparing you. The education system is going to realize this sooner or later. It’s starting. Teachers are entering the system who grew up playing games. They’re going to want to engage with the kids using games.”[12] will right – game designer

Written by Amer Khan

July 31, 2012 at 7:11 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Research on education should not like ‘normal’ social science thingy!

leave a comment »

This academic makes a point which resonates with something which has been bothering me for quite sometime:

“For years I’ve been trying to make the point that scholarly work on teaching and learning shouldn’t look like research in our disciplines or educational research.”

 

 

Written by Amer Khan

July 26, 2012 at 6:33 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

with 3 comments

The re-blogged blog says: “My point is that people are emotional learners and technology easily de-humanises and/or demonises.” mmmmm. . . makes me wonder…

Playable

The research literature offers little support for the popular (though perhaps unrealistic) rhetoric about technology revolutionising teaching and learning or teachers fundamentally re-working their lesson plans and pedagogy.

Imposed policy decisions and mechanical change models often appear unresponsive to teachers’ perspectives and their workplace constraints. A very small percentage of teachers are using social media to improve their personal practice (and in turn their classroom) and those who are often present a highly determanistic approach to technology-use. In their minds, technology creates a demand to define ‘information literacy’ to the point no everyone has a clear view as the debate is situated within a social and cultural system that cannot separate ‘technology’ from learning.

Students’ access to technology at school and at home has increased astronomically over the last few years. This access is not equitably distributed however, which creates social-inclusion and equity issues that are often secondary to the…

View original post 793 more words

Written by Amer Khan

July 26, 2012 at 6:22 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

with one comment

Ha ha…. I was thinking of starting something similar for undergrads studying the generic ‘business strategy’ unit! Anyway, no point reinventing the wheel…. the youtube videos are absolutely fantastic for generating class discussion. A priceless treasure trove of material for a strategy teacher!

StrategyProfs.net

Some of you may remember Mason Carpenter’s old teaching web page with experiential exercises, videos, and other tips for teaching strategy. I’ve repackaged his content, added some of my own materials, and it can now be found at:

CarpenterStrategyToolbox.com

A quick tip is that you can now sort the resources by topic (click the category list on the right). I included the most common broad topics in a core strategy course so this should get you to something useful quickly. Probably most importantly, there is a mechanism so people can submit new tools and comment on exiting tools to keep the site fresh.

To give you a feel for it, here are links to a few exercises and resources that you might find particularly useful:

  • Global Alliance Game (focus is on the search for complementarities and hazards in negotiating to take advantage of them).

View original post 71 more words

Written by Amer Khan

July 23, 2012 at 9:36 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

leave a comment »

I am increasingly drawn to Prof Egan’s imaginative education model. I have got his books and now tyring to find time slot to read them! But one thing I have personally noticed: My kids are most animated when I suggest the initial story opening and they try to take it further. In my recent class, I tried to experiment with a role playing game involving students playing out a scenario and taking up roles. Students were highly animated and engaged! Of course this needs careful ‘evidence based’ investigation to check pedagogical effectiveness!

Playable

With some excitement, I’ve got a new project to work on called Learning In Depth, badged as LIDKIDS University. It’s not new, and I certainly didn’t create it. However, if you are familiar with Professor Kieran Egan or his work on ‘imaginative’ education, then you may have heard of this project in Canada. This very much aligns with the work we’ve been trying to do in Massively Minecraft in many ways.

There is a lot to admire in Professor Egan’s ideas for eduction. I find a lot of what he says in his books and research to be demonstratably true in computer and video games, though he himself isn’t a ludologist, nor advocating in games based learning. This then is largly how I discoverd him, though his work in imagination, and I hope we will be able to add some game-like experiences to the established work.

LID Kids is…

View original post 207 more words

Written by Amer Khan

July 23, 2012 at 9:18 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Teaching mistakes from the college classroom

leave a comment »

Written by Amer Khan

July 20, 2012 at 11:34 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Education and entertainment

leave a comment »

“Anyone who thinks education and entertainment are different doesn’t know much about either” Marshal McLuhan

Written by Amer Khan

July 16, 2012 at 2:27 pm

Posted in Uncategorized