My Scholarly Reflections

This is where I tell what I think, so that I see what I say

Archive for August 2012

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This post provides useful links to useful pbl resources

Bianca Hewes

Haha – do you like my catchy title? Does it make you think that I’m not liking PBL, that I’m questioning this pedagogy? Hmmm … maybe I am – but then, shouldn’t I be? After all I am a budding researcher who is being trained to look critically and find ‘gaps’ in research/practice that I may be able to ‘fill’.

But really I’m just preparing myself to present on PBL to a small group of enthusiastic teachers at Riverside Girls High School. I was asked by my friend Paul Jones to assist his staff in preparing for a ‘possible’ wider-school PBL adoption on 2012. A small group of interested teachers will be the ‘pilot’ team to plan and implement subject-specific and cross-faculty PBL. I am so excited to have been asked to help fellow teachers tackle the challenge of shifting from a teacher-centred to a student-centred pedagogy. Who knows…

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Written by Amer Khan

August 21, 2012 at 6:37 pm

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The prezi on Project Base Learning (PBL) is just what the doctor ordered!

Bianca Hewes

Just realised how boring my post title is but since it is 5.43am, I hope you will forgive my lack of creativity.

About 4 weeks ago I was asked via email if I could present my experiences with PBL at my region’s English Head Teacher’s network meeting. Before I get into the guts of this post, let’s just get a couple of things clear first. 1. I am not an English Head Teacher. I am a teacher of English is a medium sized faculty with a brilliant, caring and trusting head teacher. 2. This is my seventh  year teaching English to high school students. 3. In Australia English = Language Arts. 4. I only started experimenting with PBL in Term 4 of last year thanks to the inspiration of Dean Groom.

Being asked to present on PBL was fine. The person asking me to present had seen me present on…

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Written by Amer Khan

August 21, 2012 at 5:47 pm

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Summary: 1) teacher as a reporter 2) reporters also make their stories engaging, and not just focus on facts 3) so how can teachers do that? by redesigning content around questions important for the learners, enhancing aspects which facilitate engagement, create a sense of wonder among students, and introduce puzzles/conflict (the binary aspects of good narratives). This is absolutely fantastic! Of course it is easy and intuitive so fathom but VERY HARD to implement given our lack of skills in storytelling and tight timelines. I am sure for those who do try, it holds great rewards! for more, including an example from high school history read the blog (I wish I could find an example from higher ed).

Playable

I picked up a great project on getting back from my trip. Working with Kieren Egan’s Imaginative Education (Learning In Depth). This was handy, but more importantly really exciting. I’ve been banging on about imagination for ages it seems, not least because Kieren has written some amazing things – as you do to get to the be Research Chair of Canada I guess.

So what’s new about Imaginative Education?

I think (and so do others) Imaginative Education offers a new understanding of how knowledge grows in the mind, and how our imaginations work and change during our lives. It uses different teaching methods based on these insights that offer new ways of planning and teaching. In short, I reject the bolting a clock onto a toaster mantra that is going on, and think for the most part – the vast majority of students and teachers are somewhat weary of the…

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Written by Amer Khan

August 21, 2012 at 5:17 pm

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“The only thing that int…

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“The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education” Einstein

An interference!

Written by Amer Khan

August 2, 2012 at 3:35 pm

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Now this blog post popped into my email, just when I was about to give up on games as being too hard to implement in classrooms! Thanks Dean Groom!!

Playable

I thought I’d drop a post about games-based-learning, as there seems to be total confusion about it, and where it sits with social-media. I’ll try to just make points.

  1. Games based learning could be just like a MOOC, given that games operate similarly, except there’s no time table limit, no prescribed readings in a folder and they have way better reputation systems.
  2. Game operate best when players are dialed into the ‘social graph’, so games based learning could be on Twitter, if Twitter was ‘seen’ as a text based game (which it is). You can use it, we did, no one died.
  3. Seeing a long list of who’s better than you is de-motivating to MOST people. This is why class scores suck. However leader boards are useful. Game Based Learning just re-casts better leader boards
  4. Badges work. As long as the loop they are connected to adds personal and social…

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Written by Amer Khan

August 1, 2012 at 3:53 pm

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